Grass seed & lawn seed for quality lawns

April 3, 2014

Nickys Nursery flower seeds, herb seed, wildflower, grass seed and vegetable seeds, chilli seeds and tomato seed

Large range of grass seed and lawn seed mixtures for sowing a new lawn or renovating tired and old lawns. Front ornamental lawn, back lawns and play areas, shaded lawns, embankments, woodlands to sports fields and golf course tees, greens and fairways.
Available Grass Seed Mixtures

Front Lawn Grass Seed

Seeding a lawn – A basic guide to preparing the ground, sowing the lawn seed and looking after your lawn in the following years.

Prepare the ground by removing all rubbish, stones, bricks, weeds and plants. Improve drainage wherever possible, deep digging will help. The finer the prepared seed bed the better the lawn will be.
For lawns on a heavy soil incorporate more sand while digging this will help improve drainage. On light and sandy soil incorporating a good amount of peat into the soil will prevent drying out and loss of nutrients.
Level the site taking care not to remove too much topsoil from any one area. If possible the digging of the ground should be done in the autumn and left to stand for the witer, where the rain and frost will break down the large lumps and leave it crumbly. As the soil starts to dry out in the spring is the best time to prepare the fine seedbed. Roll or rake the ground, or tread and rake it in both directions, keep working it until you achieve a firm level seedbed. It is a good idea to rake in a pre-seeding fertiliser, this helps promote root growth and provide the essential early feed for your lawn.

Sowing into heavy soil / covering seed
Should you need to mix the soil due to it being too heavy to sow the seed into, it is recommended that you use peat to break it down, or to sow the seed into as it retains more moisture and nutrients to enable seed germination.

Sowing
Seed can be sown from mid March until early October, as long as during dry periods the seedbed is kept constantly moist until the lawn is approx 5cm high. Water the seed bed with a fine spray to prevent the seeds or seedlings being displaced. During periods of drought it may be necessary to water continually to aid germination and avoid the young seedlings being scorched and killed off.
A general rule of thumb to get a good established lawn is 50 grams of seed per square metre, allowing a little extra for filling in or patching at a later date. A small area can be sown to be used as patching turf if required for any repair work later.
To sow the seed it is best to divide the area into easily manageable sections, then divide the seed accordingly. Sow half the seed for one section from left to right of the section, the other half of the seed over the first sowing but from front to back of the section. This will ensure an even spread of the types of seed over the section.

Mowing the Lawn
The first mowings are very important for good establishment of the lawn. When the lawn is 5-8cm it should be cut for the first time. Trim the lawn lightly and gradually lower the blades to the recommended mowing height of the lawn seed mixture used. Mow regularly but try not to remove more than a third of the growth at any one cutting. Do not mow the lawn when it is damp. After the first cut the lawn may be rolled, this encourages lateral growth and makes a closely knit turf.
A lawn is best mown little and often, that way you do not remove more than a third of the growth. Towards the end of the season gradually raise the cutting height of the blades. Always remove the cuttings.
Lawn Seed Mixtures

Winter Hanging Baskets

August 15, 2017

It is believed that the hanging basket was originally designed to remind a princess of home, some also believe the idea came from the hanging gardens of Babylon, it is with the wonderful versatility of this idea that we can design our own little piece of heaven from our doorstep right through to our garden. However, casting our minds back to the long, cold winter we experienced not so long ago it is probable that most of us may be reluctant to consider planning how to add warmth to our otherwise dreary doorways and garden during the late season. Despite this, in order to avoid even the slightest, sparse period it is vital to plan ahead when it comes to complimenting any garden displays throughout the seasons. When it comes to winter hanging baskets a mixture of upright and tumbling plants can have the best effect. Shrubs like Box,  heathers and carex (ornamental grass) can provide height while trailing plants like ivy not only add warmth but can also hide the edges of the basket. Bedding plants such as primroses, violas, cyclamen and polyanthus will contribute colour with winter pansies great for filling in any gaps and can be grown from seeds.

Regardless of space or the size of your doorway, choose no smaller than a 14-inch basket. Cover the inside of the basket with a coconut fibre liner, followed by a plastic disc to use as a saucer in the bottom of the hanging basket to help retain water. Using soil based compost, particularly if growing shrubs put a one-inch layer into the base of the basket. Make three small cuts across the sides of the liner or fibre. These small holes can be used to secure the plants in place, preventing damage to the root ball of each plant. Add another layer of compost followed by more plants. Once everything has been added fill the basket with compost but leave an approximate two-inch gap from the top. Pack the compost and the plants in tightly, filling any gaps with smaller flowers and compost.

During the winter months, the rugged flowers of heather are superb at filling out an arrangement and surrounding them with trailing plants such as ivy or creeping thyme will soften the edges. With preparation remaining key, why not add a few dwarf daffodil, narcissus, tulips or iris bulbs to extend the display well into spring. Once quality plants and shrubs are chosen, maintain your winter hanging basket by not letting it dry out and dead heading flowers as soon as they show any signs of fading. If weather conditions become harsh, boost your plants with a weekly liquid feed.

Historic Herbs

August 7, 2017

The history of herbs dates as far back as 50AD when records show that the Romans invaded us with knowledge gathered from the Greeks and Egyptians. They believed for example that by consuming mint their intelligence would increase. They also used mint to welcome others into their home. Around the same time dill was used as an important herb in witchcraft and as an aphrodisiac. However, it is quite probable that although no records were made the native Celts used herbs for medicinal and surgical purposes before the Romans took control. It was only slightly later that evidence of herbs such as hemlock and opium poppy were used as a form of anaesthetic in one of the largest medieval hospitals founded by King Malcolm of Scotland in 1164.

 

Good King Henry is one of the many culinary herb seeds still used today. It is easy to grow and a great source of iron. The herbs grow best in well-drained soil and although they may be slow to germinate, transplanting the herbs 1 -2 feet apart can speed up the cultivation period. Harvesting these culinary plants only at the leaves will allow the plant to continue to grow and they can be divided in early spring if they become well established. Another popular historic herb is lovage with it growing in abundance across the country for years, despite its Mediterranean origin. The herbs have been cultivated and used medicinally for sore throats and paediatric ailments such as colic, fever and jaundice. It has also been linked to having aphrodisiac properties. For best results, sow the seeds into well-rotted compost during September or October and enjoy as a culinary addition to soups, stews, rice dishes or in an aromatic tea to reduce flatulence and water retention.

 

In addition to culinary herbs,  historic herbs have made valuable contributions to beauty products throughout the ages. Ancient records reveal recipes for herb infused oils and creams in the tombs of beauty icons such as Cleopatra. Other uses included dill and laurel being used to crown heroes and pillows being stuffed with wild celery. Other herb seeds were sown and grown on for dying fabric with historic herbs such as Artemisia offering magical properties to the people of the middle ages and their juices being rubbed on babies to protect them from the cold. Rosemary was not only used as a common culinary herb but was eaten for its tranquilizing effects to cure headaches. Whatever the use culinary herbs have been used for centuries and will no doubt be used for generations to come. As we become increasingly aware of the benefits of eating and using natural resources I suspect herb seeds may be once again targeted as a primary source of nutrition, medicine and cosmetics in many a home. Considering how easy they are to grow, whether in a garden or on a windowsill herbs are most certainly a more cost effective option in this increasingly financially challenging era.

Sowing seeds for colour next year

August 6, 2017

It is common belief that once summer comes we can relax and enjoy our garden, avoiding anything more taxing than watering and the odd bit of weeding and dead heading. The thoughts of sowing seeds may be the last thing on our minds, taking comfort in the seasonal routine of frantically planning what to grow as spring approaches. This however, can be easily avoided. Sowing perennial and biennial flower seeds now (late summer into Autumn) will not only prove less stressful next year but means that what you do sow will flower earlier and last for longer in your garden, creating the most vibrant of flower borders and hanging baskets well ahead of the rest.

 

Although a colourful garden may be the desired effect it is wise to put some thought into which colours to choose. Opting for primary colours can be a safe bet to create a plenitude of shades but seeing as there is plenty of planning time why not analyse the specific colours needed to get the most out of your outdoor space. Blue and white flowers will create a sense of distance, while pastel colours are best suited to low light conditions. Orange and red can be perfect to warm up an otherwise cool corner. Advanced thought can give your garden that je ne sais quoi with only matching furniture and lighting to worry about come spring. Calendula seeds come in a variety of eye-catching colours. Some of the varieties Kablouana and Snow Princess can be sown September, kept in a cold frame and their stunning double flowers will complement the dullest of borders early next year. With violas offering a magnificent choice of colours from red with blotch to sky blue they are a perfect choice to sow now. Other species to sow late summer are Lupins, Hardy Geraniums, Hollyhocks, Aquilegia and Verbascum. And if a Victorian cottage garden is your desired look don’t hesitate to sow some biennials seeds and overwinter until spring.  Sow outdoors Ammi Majus, Poppies, Nigella and Delphiniums to name but a few.

 

Whatever your preference, all the seeds can be sown in the same way. Half fill a tray with good quality, peat based compost. Avoid using potting compost when sowing seeds as it contains high levels of fertiliser that can damage young roots. Clean all pots and containers thoroughly as old compost can harbour diseases. Sow the seeds in rows, cover lightly with compost and water gently. Pots containing very small seeds should be surface sown and should be watered from the bottom by being left to soak only until the surface is evenly wet and then removed and allowed to drain. You may wish to cover the tray with a transparent cover for the initial stages of germination and if sowing during the summer months store the seeds in a cold frame. You may even be able to find some seeds in your current garden that have been blown from the flowers ready for harvesting. If these are gathered be sure to hang them in paper bags to dry out completely and then store them in manila envelopes until you are ready to use them. Avoid too much handling of these young seeds and maintain the key standard of hygiene when sowing.

Garden Games fun for all the family

August 6, 2017

With purse strings tight and a family weekend at a theme park costing short of a week for two in Majorca there is no better time than to utilise our outdoor space and have some fun with garden games for all the family. I am very sure that the majority of us have fond memories of at least one particular board game. Whether the suspense of snakes and ladders or the more strategic 4 in a row is preferred these classic games cannot only strengthen basic social skills but can also provide the foundations for fond memories. With a range of educational elements they can also help children with focussed tasks, not to mention fulfilling children’s most desired way to pass the time and that is to be with you. While we all lead busy lives, garden games can enrich the time we spend with our children and satisfy their thirst for competing and learning new skills.

 

Giant Snakes and Ladders

Giant Snakes and Ladders

Without trying to avoid the rapid development of childhood treasures it is never more important to find a balance between the necessary gadgets of the digital generation and satisfaction of simple educational games that have been moulding characters for years. Timeless games such as skittles and the more sophisticated croquet can teach children basic skills that will carry them right into adulthood. Apart from sharing and taking turns these activities will provoke interaction with others that no amount of online games will provide. The strategic thinking required in chess can encourage young people to not only think more strategically but to expand their skills in problem solving. Get knotted, along with other physical games will encourage everyone to get active in the garden while having fun and will make a valuable contribution to a healthier lifestyle for children and adults alike. A range of gym equipment for all ages can also be the perfect addition to your garden to keep everybody fit and healthy. Games tables such as air hockey, pool and table tennis can encourage competitive games between pairs or even provide weeks of fun if a tournament is organised, building confidence and helping children avoid falling into the common trap of dreading school sports. Alternatively, sandpits allow younger children to explore their senses and can be therapeutic for any challenging behaviour young people may struggle with.

 

Croquet Set

Croquet Sets

These oversized activities will not only add a contemporary look to any lawn or terrace but can also add a fun twist to any garden party. Some would argue that the humble board game has played an intricate role in the development of society and that the rise of social media could have a detrimental effect on the structure of social relationships as we know them. Croquet in fact was one of the first opportunities for women to play outdoor games with men, with tight croquet offering the perfect opportunity for the ball to be hit into the bushes and team mates to search for it together. So why not abandon the tweets for one weekend and invite some friends over for some good wholesome fun….you never know who you might meet while searching for that ball!

Chilli seeds

October 4, 2016

Sow seeds early as some hot peppers can take 120+ days from transplanting to fruiting. Temp should be maintained at the indicated temp 25-30°C chilli seeds will germinate at 25C but will take longer 30C+ is the preferred temp for hot chillies Jolokia, Morich, Tepin and Habanero chillies they can also be slow and erratic to emerge

Chilli Trinidad Genghis Khan Brain

Capsicum chinense
Extremely hot rare chilli ripening from green to red, pimply skin, fruity tones and rivals the heat of many superhots, believed to be a Trinidad Scorpion cross.

Peppers Chilli Trinidad 7 Pot Katie 10 seeds

Chilli Trinidad 7 Pot Katie

Capsicum chinense
A Trinidad 7 pot / Naga cross, bred in the UK and coming in at over 1,500,000 SHU. Large pods ripen from green to dark red with a fruity flavour.

Peppers Chilli Trinidad Genghis Khan Brain 10 seeds

Chilli Trinidad Apocalypse Scorpion

C chinense
Fruity tones and rivals the heat of many superhots this chilli was developed by the Italian growing Organisation AIASP. Wrinkled skins and various shaped fruits ripen to bright red in colour.

Peppers Chilli Trinidad Apocalypse Scorpion 10 seeds

Chilli Trinidad Sepia Serpent

Capsicum chinense
A Butch T x Douglah, chocolate brown in colour and occasionally a little red in the brown. A sweet earthy flavour and heat level is extremely hot, very large pods with rough pimply skin, plants produce different shaped pods similar to other chocolate varieties.

Peppers Chilli Trinidad Sepia Serpent 10 seeds

Chilli Trinidad 7 Pot Chocolate Brain Strain

Capsicum chinense
Very hot Brainstrain chilli, Pods ripen from light green to Brown and have a fruity earthy flavour.

Peppers Chilli Trinidad 7 Pot Chocolate Brain Strain 10 seeds

 

Grow your vegetables from seed

September 25, 2016

Vegetable seeds grow your own Vegetables, oriental veg, baby veg, patio container veg, cut and come again, heirloom, Italian range, tomato, pepper, beans, peas, salad and root vegetables. Nothing can compare to harvesting your own vegetables full of freshness and flavour straight from the garden. No matter what the size of your vegetable garden, from containers on the patio to planting vegetables in your flower border or growing vegetables on an allotment.  It’s simple, easy and nothing beats growing your own vegetables, children will enjoy sowing seeds, growing and eating their own home produce.

Vegetable Seeds

 

Tomato Seeds grow your own tomato plants

September 21, 2016

Tomato seeds over 190 varieties, from only £0.75 a pkt, Black Pear, Big Boy, Carbon, Chocolate Cherry, Porterhouse, and Floridity tomato seeds are just a few of our customers favourites. Grow Your Own Magazine top tomato varieties we stock include Sweet Aperitif, Alicante, Green Envy, Sungold, Garden Pearl, Tumbling Tom Red, Big Daddy, Super Marmande, Brandywine, Mountain Magic, Lizzano, Moneymaker, Gardeners Delight and Shirley. Buy Tomato seeds by type i.e for heirloom tomatoes, hanging basket, outdoor, glasshouse, plum, cherry, grape, currant, beefsteak and patio tomato seed varieties. UK Tomato seeds supplier.

tomato-seed-collections

Heirloom Tomato seeds

September 11, 2016

We have many heirloom seed varieties in stock and over 190 tomato varieties to choose from, heirloom, plum, beefsteak, currant and tomato seeds for hanging basket varieties available from Nicky’s Tomato Seeds.

Tomato seeds Black pear
Unusual Heirloom miniature pear shaped tomato, producing an abundance of mahogany brown to black fruits approximately 170 gram with green shoulders, full of flavour with a rich sweet taste. Ideal for salads or for a tomato sauce. Black Russian tomato of Siberian origin (similar to Japanese Black Trifele). Easy to grow tomato seeds. Indeterminate 80 days
Tomato Black Pear 10 seeds

Tomato seeds Abraham Lincoln
The original strain of Heirloom tomato Abraham Lincoln. Dark red extra large meaty fruits up to 500g. Crack resistant variety. Excellent flavour for sauces, tomato ketchup, slicing in salads and sandwiches. 87 days Indeterminate.

Tomato seeds Druzba
Mini Beefsteak heirloom variety originating from Bulgaria. Superb flavoured pure red tomato up to 10cm across that is excellent in sandwiches and salads. Indeterminate (cordon) 80 days. Grow your own tomato plants from seeds.

Grow your own Basil

September 11, 2016

Culinary Herb Basil Blue Spice

Herb Basil Blue Spice

With purse strings becoming tighter and the opportunity to dine out becoming a treat, why not add a bit of zing to some home cooked food by growing basil in your kitchen or garden. Whether you prefer sweet Blue Spice basil or the more familiar Basil Bush, traditionally used in Italian cuisine these versatile herbs can be the home grown answer to tantalize any taste buds and warm up the dullest of weekends. A perfect companion to any Bolognese basil can also be added to freshen up a home made cocktail on a summer’s day. Not only do such herbs taste better fresh they can also have a soothing effect on the stomach, aiding digestion.

Culinary Herb Basil Sweet

Basil Sweet

In order to enjoy the herb’s full potential, plant basil in March and use it at its best between May and September. Use small pots containing equal amounts of perlite, vermiculite and peat. Dampen the soil and drop two to three seeds into each pot. Sprinkle with soil and using a transparent cover, leave the tray in a warm, sunny spot. Once the seedlings emerge remove the cover and water lightly every day. Basil can be transferred into the garden but it is best to wait until the summer months and to choose a spot well exposed to plenty of sunlight. Be mindful to remove any flowers which may appear from too much sun. The blooms cause a hormone change in the herb and significantly reduce the flavour of the leaves. Once the stalk reaches a reasonable height the herb is ready to be pruned. Carefully remove the top two leaves, avoiding any damage to smaller leaves below. With cultivation a success and fresh herbs at your finger tips the only thing left to do is indulge your culinary skills.
Nicky’s Basil Seeds for a full range of seeds

Tomato Gigantomo seeds

September 9, 2016

Currently the largest beefsteak tomato available, it has the flavour of the heritage varieties but with the vigour and disease resistance of modern tomatoes. Productive disease resistant hybrid plants, fruits weigh up to 3lbs up to 11 fruits per plant. Just one fruit can feed a family. Recommended to be staked and grown in a greenhouse although they will grow in a sheltered spot outdoors. Indeterminate (cordon) Buy tomato Gigantomo seeds

Tomato Gigantomo 10 seeds

Tomato Seeds


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